Rotary Club of Conifer

Be a Local Hero!

 
Volunteer, join Rotary, or donate. Pick what interests you and have fun with new friends!
 
  • Help run ConiferFest, or the Foothills Home & Garden Show, to raise money for local non-profits.
  • Feed kids through our 285 Backpack Project. We buy discounted food from Food Bank of the Rockies and distribute packages weekly to kids in need at the Conifer and Bailey schools.
  • Help teachers by reading with kids, judging pumpkin contests and even helping little ones build their first robot!
  • Aid our community by helping local elderly with projects, or cleaning up an adopted road. 
  • Prepare for Wildfire: We teach wildfire preparedness at community events through Wildfire Ready. We work with officials to improve infrared spotting of new blazes, and plans for evacuation and mitigation.
  • International: We support ending polio worldwide, Blankets for Ukraine in this cold winter, and support for Sasa Harambee - an organization partnering with local communities in Kenya. 
 
Contact us to get involved or click the donate link below:  rotaryconifer@gmail.com 
 
 
 
Be sure to note in PayPal if you want to finance a specific effort.
 
Join us! 
Conifer Rotary meets Tuesday mornings at 8:00 AM in a hybrid format either at the Mountain Resource Center or online via videoconference over Zoom. Evening meetings are currently being held in person every 2nd and 4th Wednesday of the month at 5:30 PM at Our Lady of the Pines.
 
Visitors please join us, email us at rotaryclub@rotaryconifer.org and we will send you the information you need for the meetings.  Club members, check your email for online meeting details from our President.
Blankets for Ukraine
 
Ukrainians are facing a freezing winter without windows and heat, due to bombing.
 
Your donation to Conifer Rotary Foundation supports a project run by a Rotary club in Kharkiv, Ukraine, to have 25,000 waterproof blankets manufactured in Ukraine. Your help provides jobs during the war, and free blankets for Ukrainians.
 
You can help by donating cash, check or credit card at Conifer Rotary Foundation, PO Box 1430, Conifer 80433 or by clicking the donate button below.
 
Please specify “Ukraine blankets” on the PayPal site so your donation sent to the right place.
 
Rotary Conifer Peace Park

Rotary of Conifer Celebrates Blessing of Peace Park Installation at the  Aspen Park Community Center

Amidst aspens in full glory, a blessing ceremony to celebrate the inaugural stage of the Conifer Rotary Peace Park took place on Sunday, September 25 at the Aspen Park Community Center.

The Conifer Peace Park is a place to reflect on peace and to hold events dedicated to peacebuilding.  

The park’s central Conifer location, in a lovely grove of aspen trees behind the Aspen Park Community Center (APCC), was made possible by the APCC Home Improvement Association.  The park also received generous support from Rotary Club International District 5450, Rotary Club of Conifer, Peacebuilding Club members, and the Conifer community, which contributed funding, skill and sweat for the park. 

“Although the installation has only begun with the placement of benches and boulders, persons who have visited the park say it already gives off a peaceful aura,” said Stanley Harsha, co-chair of Conifer Rotary Peacebuilder Committee.  “The project will be completed by May 2023 with native landscaping and peace poles with messages of peace.”

Rotary Club of Conifer President Diana Phelps cut the ribbon marking the beginning of the Peace Park. She noted that the 285 Corridor’s first peace park is being realized in only four months from conception to installation.   

The park will hold events in the future to commemorate peace and to educate about peace, with an emphasis on reaching children. 

Dennis Swiftdeer Paige, Peacebuilding Club member and the park’s landscape designer, offered a Native American Coal Bundle blessing, carefully collected and containing a piece of coal from The Sacred Fire at Northeastern Illinois University in Chicago. Bobby Siles, trained by Lakotas as a certified medicine man, blew sacred smoke to bless the park as a place of peace. 

This park takes its place among over a hundred peace parks worldwide. Rotary International established its first peace park in 1932 at the U.S.-Canadian border.  

One feature of the park is a boulder with an inscription of the Rotary Four-Way test, which embodies principles of peacebuilding. "Of the things we think, say or do: 

  • Is it the TRUTH? 

  • Is it FAIR to all concerned? 

  • Will it build GOODWILL and BETTER FRIENDSHIPS? 

  • Will it be BENEFICIAL to all concerned?” 

 

For more information, e-mail stanleyharsha@outlook.com

Photos

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Conifer and Bailey residents worked together to install boulders and benches in August

 
Rotary of Conifer Peace Park blessed amidst Aspens in full autumn glory
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Dennis Swiftdeer Paige offers Native American blessing
 
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Trained in Lakota ways, Bobby Siles blows smoke to bless the park as a place of Peace
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Rotary of Conifer Diana Phelps cuts ribbon for Peace Park installation
 
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Peace Park embodies principles of 4-Way Test
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Rotary of Conifer Peacebuilder Co-Chair Stanley Harsha remarks how visitors find the Peace Park to have an aura of peace.
 
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"Imagine all the people living life in peace"
 
 
 
 
285 Backpack Pantry Program
 

 

Children who are hungry have difficulty staying focused for learning. They experience mood swings. They have trouble participating in athletics and other activities. They experience stomach aches, headaches and fatigue. Chronic hunger impacts kids for a lifetime.

One in five children in Colorado belong to families that cannot afford food or do not have regular access to food.  The 285 Backpack Project is here to help.

The 285 Backpack Project is sponsored by the Rotary Club of Conifer and the communities of Conifer and Bailey.  We help children who do not have enough food to eat at home by providing them with easy-to-prepare weekend meals and snacks throughout the school year.  By helping to sustain these children, we want to not only help meet their nutritional needs but also promote their physical, cognitive and social development, and enhance their overall sense of well-being.

  • Rotary members order the food from the Food Bank of the Rockies to fill our 285 Backpack pantry and every week during the school year, volunteers from the community meet to fill bags with a variety of easy to prepare, nutritious foods for kids to take home.  
  • The school arranges delivery of the bags to the children whose families have requested the food.  Any child is eligible.  All families are invited by letter from the principal to participate.

 

Want to make a difference?  You can help by volunteering through the sign-up genius below, by making a donation to the Conifer Rotary Foundation or by helping to get families signed up.

 
 
Meeting Programs
Emmy West
Dec 06, 2022
Park County
Rotary Foundation Donations
Join us in our Conifer Rotary Foundation efforts to make our local community and the world a better place.
 
 
Join us in supporting the Rotary International Foundation's many national and international humanitarian projects by clicking HERE.
End Polio Now
Rotary is an international community that brings together leaders who step up to take on the world’s toughest challenges, locally and globally. The eradication of polio is one of our longest standing and most significant efforts. Along with our partners, we have helped immunize more than 2.5 billion children against polio in 122 countries. We have reduced polio cases by 99.9 percent worldwide and we won't stop until we end the disease for good.
 
Learn more by visiting: 
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Upcoming Events
Member Dues Payments
Club members can make dues payments here.
 
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Rotary Conifer News
Updates and Announcements 

December 6th and December 13th Morning Meetings: Can you make it in person on Dec. 13th? Ann Imse’s presentation on electric vehicles had to be postponed from Dec. 6th to Dec. 13th due to minor surgery on her hand. Ann’s been driving electric for six years. She will give an overview and answer your questions in the meeting, and hopes to have a Tesla Model S, a Chevy Bolt, a VW and a Tesla Model 3 for you to see, after the meeting and possibly before the meeting. For those interested, Ann also will schedule test drives in her Tesla over the course of a number of meeting days. December 6th will now feature Emmy West of Park County Government. 
 
Club Social: Our club's Holiday Social will be on 12/4 4pm at Janine’s house. It will be a Potluck; the theme will be “ugly sweater”.
 
Wyatt Guernsey: Diana has been doing Interact for many years. One young man, Wyatt Guernsey, has been in since 7th grade. He’s working at Clayton, Dubilier & Rice in NYC and is coordinating a $5000 donation to this club because he has been such a part of us for so long and Conifer Rotary and Interact has been such an influence on him.
 
Evening Meeting Discussion: A meeting to discuss the evening meeting with the help of our past District Governor Bill Downes on December 13th 5-6 PM at Amanda’s house. Bill will be our mediator in helping to figure out how to move forward with our club and ensuring that the evening and morning meetings are part of a single club. R.S.V.P by 12/9 if you are interested in attending.
 
Sponsoring Families: The Club will be working with the Boys & Girls Club to sponsor three families for the holidays. More details to follow.
 
Sergeant at Arms: A Sergeant-at-Arms is needed for December and beyond. Contact Diana if you are interested in helping out for a month.
 
Salvation Army Bell Ringing: The Salvation Army is accepting volunteers for bell ringing starting November 25th - December 24th. If you are interested in signing up to volunteer, you can contact Angela who can provide a link to a sign-up genius.
 
285 Backpack Project: The 285 Backpack Project helps children who don't have enough food to eat at home by providing them with easy-to-prepare weekend meals and snacks throughout the school year. We are always looking for volunteers to help with this mission. To sign up to volunteer, Click Here or email 285backpackproject@gmail.com. 
 
 
 
Upcoming Events & Training:
 
Below is just a snapshot of upcoming events. All District Events can be found by going to the Rotary District 5450 Website.
 
Holiday Party: Holiday Party will be on Dec 4th at Janine’s place, details to follow.
 
Throw-Back Thursday on a Saturday: will be held on January 21 at the Aspen Park Community Center, details to follow.
 
Home and Garden Show: April 1st and 2nd at Evergreen High School.
 
2023 District Conference: The 2023 District Conference is scheduled for April 29th.
 
Rotary Peaches Fundraiser: August 2023
 
ConiferFest: August 12th
 
 
 
Polio Plus:
 
 
 
Rotary has been working to eradicate polio for more than 35 years. Our goal of ridding the world of this disease is closer than ever. 
 
As a founding partner of the Global Polio Eradication Initiative, we’ve reduced polio cases by 99.9 percent since our first project to vaccinate children in the Philippines in 1979.
 
Rotary members have contributed more than $2.1 billion and countless volunteer hours to protect nearly 3 billion children in 122 countries from this paralyzing disease. Rotary’s advocacy efforts have played a role in decisions by governments to contribute more than $10 billion to the effort.
 
Today, polio remains endemic only in Afghanistan and Pakistan. But it’s crucial to continue working to keep other countries polio-free. If all eradication efforts stopped today, within 10 years, polio could paralyze as many as 200,000 children each year. It costs $3.00 to fully protect a child against polio, including the cost of the vaccine and activities required to deliver the vaccine.
 
 
 
Meeting Program: Guest Speakers - Daniel Knudsen and Dr. Roger Matthews from Park County Search and Rescue
 
  • We had terrific speakers from Park County Search and Rescue, who showed us how a search dog can find people! Daniel Knudsen, president, and Dr. Roger Matthews, dog handler.
  • Matthews: Asked if he thinks they are doing more rescues because people are being stupid in the wilderness, he said, “I don’t think people are being stupid. I think it is great people are outside.”
  • We use the dogs’ natural hunting ability to find people. It takes awhile to train the dogs. Mixed breed dogs are fine. Most important: They need a drive, for food or something, so we can train that. Train to a human smell. We have dogs who can detect Coronavirus to 1 part per million, or melanoma, or viruses, seizures, hypoglycemia. They get kicked out of service dog training because they will run after the ball rolling by. 
  • We train in Colorado for scent specificity, to look for one specific person, not the other searchers or hikers. We have hormones, lotions, individual scent from skin cells. We lose 40,000 skin cells a minute. That’s what most of the dust in your house is. Microbes eat the cells and we think they give off gases.
  • It takes the dog only a second to get the scent. We use a piece of clothing from the person, preferably organic like cotton. Try to get non-contaminated scent articles, so don’t handle it. Dogs can work off the scent in the air coming off the person, or scent that falls to the ground. Trailing dogs work on a leash. Air scent dogs work off leash. The dogs work on a grid. We try to get downwind of where we think the person is, or start at the person’s car and track from there. We can leapfrog ahead with an air scent dog. Need to find people quickly in the winter. 
  • Handler and dogs do a yearly physical fitness test. I take my dog to 12,000 feet. About 80 percent of dogs don’t make it. Best ones are hunting and herding dogs. Labs, Golden Retrievers, English shepherds.
  • Finn, 10, gets very upset if the person is deceased. I protect him a little bit. Brody, 5, is like, whatever, get up!
  • They started by demonstrating a search in the meeting room. It was hard for the dog because the air is not moving, and lots of scents to sort through. Yvonne hid behind the screens in back. 
  • Finn will remember the scent for hours. He had bells jingling. He is an English shepherd, an old American herding dog. Finn jumped up excitedly when he saw a scent article in a plastic bag. He barked. He has to calibrate, he checked the ground for a scent.
  • We are at the mercy of weather. Roger: I got lost when I was a kid and was found by a dog, so I always wanted to work with dogs. His dog’s life is great. He’s already been on a five-mile hike today, dog-walker comes while we are at work, and after work he does some work or training.
  • Daniel: 50 calls per year, up to 10 a month in summer. Sometimes in Denver. We are responsible for all of Park County. And 80% of the county is public land, with four fourteeners, Colorado Trail, etc. We saw an increase in winter during Covid crowds. It’s dropping off now. Climbing 14-ers is not as attractive as it was. 
  • We are a 501c3. Various sources of income, grants, fundraising, not county funded. Some money from hunting licenses etc. One year we had a jump in donations because we rescued a Microsoft executive, who donated. Budget is $40,000 a year, including buildings, snowmobiles, radios, vehicles, training. We don’t charge for rescues, because we don’t want people to not call for fear of the cost. We get old vehicles from Park County sheriff, typically 100,000 miles on them.
  • Colorado has more than 3,000 rescues a year. Law gives the responsibility to the county sheriff, but they don’t have enough money. 
  • If you are lost, you can text us. 
  • Summit County is far more busy. 80 members.
  • Asked for the best tracker, he recommended Garmin Inreach and Spot X, anything that is a satellite
    messenger.
Ways that Rotary can help: We could use $15,000 to replace an ATV, $10,000 for an OHV Trailer, $5000 for training, $4,000 for helmets, etc. His email is DKnudsen@pcsar.org